Know the Numbers: On-the-Job Construction and Concrete Dangers

For people who work in construction or concrete, dangers are an everyday part of the job. From fall hazards to the risks of working near traffic and even the dangers of concrete dust, seemingly simple oversights can lead to disastrous consequences. Have you ever wondered exactly where things stand in the world of workplace injuries? The U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics can help. The federal agency recently released 2017 statistics regarding the number of workers who experienced injuries, illness — or even death — while at work. Here are a few key takeaways:

5,147 People Were Killed on the Job in 2017
That works out to more than 99 people per week — and more than 14 deaths daily. A vast majority (4,674) of those deaths were among workers in private industry.

More than 20% of 2017’s Private Industry Fatalities Were in Construction
In other words, about one in five worker fatalities took place in our line of work. Of the year’s 971 construction industry deaths, the top causes — or “fatal four” — include:
•Falls (381 deaths, or 39.2%)
•Being Struck by an Object (80 deaths, or 8.2%)
•Electrocutions (71 deaths, or 7.3%)
•Being Caught in or Compressed by Equipment or Objects (50 deaths, or 5.1%)

The Agency Noted Other Key Facts in a December Press Release
•The overall number of worker deaths was slightly down from 2016’s 5,190
•Fatal falls were at their highest number since the agency began tracking them, coming in at 887 total, or 17% of worker deaths
•Among those killed on the job in 2017, 15% were 65 years old or older

Construction and concrete dangers might exist on the job, but as any crewmember can tell you, the work can also be deeply satisfying. The key is to remain vigilant, to keep team members properly trained and to always be on the lookout for ways to make operations safer. Our Safety page is filled with advice your crew can use. Stop by, read on — and play it safe out there!


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